Personal Statement To Study Art In Paris

Required for all BFA Applicants

Submit a portfolio of 10 to 20 images. Applicants are encouraged to submit their best and most recently completed work showing a range of technical skills and creativity. The admissions committee is particularly interested in how applicants research and communicate their ideas. The portfolio can contain any combination of media including drawing, painting, sculpture, installation art, video, photography, sound, motion graphics, communication design, fashion design, illustration, etc. Applicants are encouraged to carefully edit their portfolio considering the arrangement and order of their work. BFA Transfer, Study Abroad and Exchange applicants are encouraged to submit works that align with the area of study for which they are applying.

To submit the portfolio, create an account on the website parisedu.slideroom.com. Upload your visual material (images or video) and submit directly through Slideroom.

Submit your portfolio on slideroom.parisedu.slideroom.com

Here’s an example of a common prompt:
”A personal statement of 1,000 words or less from the nominee describing his or her background, interests, plans for graduate study and career aspirations. The statement should include a discussion of some experiences and ideas that have shaped those interests, plans and aspirations.”

As Mary Tolar has noted, “If you are applying for nationally competitive scholarships, for graduate school, or for a number of post-graduate service or employment opportunities, you have seen the vaguely phrased request; in one form or another, it comes down to “tell us something about yourself… You are asked to share your “academic and other interests. A clearer charge might be: compose an essay that reveals who you are, what you care about, and what you intend to do in this life. Tell this story in a compelling manner, and do so in less than a thousand words. What’s so hard about that? Simply make sense of your life. (right.) But what does that mean?”

The personal statement is more like a genre than a rubric; there are set of constraints, but no formulas. This means that we need to triangulate our understanding of what it will be with more than one piece of advice rather than a single definition.

For that reason, I recommend you begin by printing out Mary Tolar’s advice. Highlight the phrases that strike you as helpful. Chances are, these are the phrases that surprise you or confirm what was a hunch. Noticing what stands out will help reveal assumptions you may not have even known you had. (This is a stage in the process that should not be overlooked in your rush to master the personal statement. The more you notice what you are learning, the easier the process will become.) 

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